Falling down: Accept your fate and roll with it

Falling down: Accept your fate and roll with it is a very timely and helpful piece that appeared in
The Globe and Mail Metro (Ontario Edition) on January 26, written by KATE MURPHY
KATHY OSBORN of the New York Times. It's a good 'heads up' for aging boomers and our elderly parents and other loved ones.


Rare is the individual who hasn’t tripped over a pet or uneven pavement, tumbled off a bike, slipped on ice or maybe wiped out skiing or skating.


Some get injured while others go unhurt – often claiming it’s because they knew how to fall.

Continue reading “Falling down: Accept your fate and roll with it”

We must protect the elderly and aging when crossing streets

The Mayor of the City of Toronto recently called to safety islands to be created for the elderly and aging to use when crossing busy and large intersections. This is has been an issue on my mind for a long time. The piece below I wrote last year precisely about this all too common threat. 

Bottom line: We must protect the elderly and aging when crossing streets.


Watching the ribbon of news on roll across the bottom of my television is often very disturbing. 

Continue reading “We must protect the elderly and aging when crossing streets”

Check signs for possible health issues

Here is an interesting recent article in the Toronto Star that explores how we need to check signs of physical and emotional change for possible health issues. It's relevant not only to those of us passing through middle age, but also for our aging parents and loved ones.

Take a read:  https://www.thestar.com/life/health_wellness/2016/12/26/most-health-problems-are-not-due-to-aging.html

 

 

Our annual eldercare advice for the holidays

This seems to be a big favourite year over year:

Suggestions of how to bet support aging parents and loved ones through family events.

Please take a look, and share with your friends, too.

Here it is:  http://www.parentingyourparents.ca/plan-good-holida…derly-loved-ones/ ‎

Antipsychotic medications are warranted, but being relied upon far too often in seniors with dementia

Antipsychotic medications are warranted, but are being relied upon far too often in seniors with dementia.

Here is a recent Globe and Mail article exploring this important issue: Read this on The Globe and Mail

Caring for a parent afflicted with Alzheimers

Caring for a parent afflicated with Alzheimers is challenging.

Listen here https://soundcloud.com/680cjob/parenting-our-parents​ as Dr. Michael Gordan discusses key considerations in a CJOB 680 interivew with host Jeff Currier in Winnipeg.

Nursing home drama: wrong treatment

This is an email from a long time friend on the west coast. 

Her point is simple and poignent… a nursing home drama: wrong treatment.

Her challenge: how to help her failing fahter.

It's not pretty, and so many of us experience the same trauma. 

Please read on.

On Thursday, dad's geriatric psychiatrist contacted me to discuss his treatment. The facility is saying he is being aggressive, so they are looking at his meds to adjust. Less than a half hour later the doctor called me back asking if the facility had contacted me because they are indicating they will send him to emergency where he will essentially be sedated. The doctor doesn't agree with this and has him on the waiting list to get into the geriatric floor at the hospital. 

Dad is physically fine, he gets around and is busy. He tends to get into other people's rooms and moves everything around and tries to fix things. His eyesight is really bad, so he feels for things. One care aide at the home is calling this aggressive behaviour. He has had a couple of incidents, but they were because he was alone and could have been redirected, no one was hurt or even close to being hurt. Dad jokingly does a one two jab action, then laughs. It is a jest, not aggressive whatsoever. His main care aides say he is the least aggressive person, but busy and gets into things. The facility have told us we have to be there from the time he wakes until he goes to sleep or they will send him to emergency here he will be sedated and returned to the facility or he may not have anywhere to go. 

The home has a lack of staff and often there is often no LPN on his floor. If they are on breaks there is no one there. This is a dementia unit for high needs patients. They will move in temporary replacement staff that do not have dementia training, nor read the patients charts and make comments such as why are we even feeding these people.

They have lost his shoes, his dentures, his glasses, they don't shave him and I have to ask for him to be changed. They are supposed to contact us when incidents occur and they haven't.

It is appalling. I am putting in a formal complaint to the health authority, licensing board, and ministry. The disease is hard enough on its own without having to deal with the system. Not sure why I am sharing, except that I know you went through the disease part. This is not the norm as far as care, is it? I am working with the doctor and hopefully we can get him into a place that has adequate care. 

Maybe you need a follow up book on how to ensure your parent is being cared for?

Clearly, her father needs the right kind of care. 

He seems to need regular attention and care. And a way to vent his interets and energy.  It seems he's not violent or dangerous. But ongoing stimulation may be needed.

Bottom line: the system needs stronger checks and balances. It needs to be able to effectively understand and manage the needs to those who are suffering from various stages of dementia. 

 

Elderly need to beware of identity theft efforts

Identity theft has become a major issue for us all. 

And the elderly need to beware of identiy theft efforts that are expanding at a huge rate.

This site we're recommending is really more US focused. But it also offers a lot of good advice for our Canadian followers who should be especially beware of Canada Revenue Agency knock offs!

It's worth checking out. Especially since identiy theft is so prevelent. For your aging loved ones, and even for yourself.

Check it out here: 

http://www.thesimpledollar.com/best-identity-theft-protection-services/

Free course about understanding dementia

We tripped across this multi-week free course offered online by the University of Tasmania in Australia. We did not sign up, but we did poke around and it looks interesting, engaging, and helpful. 

It's worth checkng out. 

Go here: https://mooc.utas.edu.au/?utm_source=Facebook&utm_medium=Landing%20Page&utm_campaign=UDMOOC