A very helpful guide to medical alert systems for the elderly

Since our very first book together in 2002, we've been big advocates to home safety measures for the elderly. We've both written and talked extensively about 'elder proofing' the home of our aging parents in a timely way. It's like having an insurance policy.

One critical component of home safety is having a reliable monitoring system. 

We have found a very interesting online site that reviews various products. One of its recent reviews was on home monitoring systems. It looks thorough, reliable, and unbiased. We thought you may find it helpful. It's here: http://www.reviews.com/medical-alert-systems/

Plan now to plan ahead for the right substitute decision maker

Choose the right substitute decision makers (SDM) now.

With all the recent focus on what is now called advance care planning (ACP) in the medical and social work literature, it is important for people especially middle-aged and older people to understand what is at stake.

Using the old terminology of a "living well" there has been a transformation from what used to be a few words in a document somewhere or as a conversation with the family member likely to be the SDM that for example the parent "would not want any heroics" if they develop a terminal illness. The reality is that is no longer enough to help those empowered to make such decisions on your behalf. The new world of medicine has many things that can be done that are no longer considered "heroics" but just part of contemporary every day medicine.

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Aging well: helping our elderly parents get the most out of their lives

This article could help you think about ways to inspire your aging parents to get the most out of their lives moving ahead. 

It focuses on lifestyle, motivation, activities, and social interaction. Read it here: http://ctv.news/cAtd84g

Alzheimer’s in the family? Should you test yourself?

Here is a very thought-provoking recent article from the Globe & Mail about whether those of us caring for aging parents with dementia should consider getting ourselves tested to see if we have the gene that will more than likely ensure we end up with Alzheimers. It will make you think about this pressing dilemma. 

A blood test can reveal if you carry a hereditary gene, but many people decline to find out.


Marty and Matt Reiswig, two brothers in Denver, knew that Alzheimer’s disease ran in their family, but neither of them understood why. Then a cousin, Gary Reiswig, whom they barely knew, wrote a book about their family, The Thousand Mile Stare.

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Elderly parents may be taking wrong medications

 

This is an interesting and worrysome article about how many aging people are taking the wrong medicines: http://www.ctvnews.ca/health/more-than-400m-a-year-spent-in-canada-on-drugs-that-harm-seniors-study-1.2956741

If you haven't, it might be a good time to ensure your aging parents and loved ones are taking the right meds. Talkk with them; ask their pharmacists to go over what they take. And don't forget over the counter medicines and vitamins.

Summer safety for our elder parents and even us!

Most of us look forward to summer. Those who can often take vacation during this season, and many families use it for opportunities to visit their loved ones especially if they are far away from where we live year round.


For those who can, summer is often a time of recreational outdoor activities which may include long walks, swimming, going to beaches and such activities as cycling. Of interest is the fact that with the expansion of the older population many what have been referred to as seniors or elders are now actively involved in physical activities including those outdoors.

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How technology could help with dementia care

Here is a really interesting recent article on hoe evolving technology could do more to help in the home where demential is an issue and challenge:


A chance conversation was all it took to give Alex Mihailidis’s burgeoning career a new focus.
As a graduate student in 1996, the now 41-year-old met a man whose wife had developed dementia in her early 50s. Her bizarre behaviour, such as taking soiled toilet paper, folding it up and hiding it around the house, had her husband at wit’s end.

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Study shows better palliative care needed

Posted on May 2016 by

This is an interesting and relevant article that should be of interest to all of us who are caring for  declining older parents and other loved ones:

Thousands of Canadians are suffering unnecessarily each year because they do not have access to palliative care, says a new study by the Canadian Cancer Society that calls on governments to make end-of-life care part of a new federal-provincial health accord.

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Childless, unmarried baby boomers warned to prepare for future

Childless, unmarried baby boomers warned to prepare for future.
Dr. Mireille Norris says elder orphans are a growing problem across the country.
    
A new study is raising awareness about the problem of "elder orphans" — seniors who have no children, spouse or any other family member to care for them as they age.
The research comes on the heels of an incident earlier this week in North Carolina in which an 81-year-old cancer patient with no caregiver called 911 to ask someone to buy him some food.
Dr. Maria Torroella Carney, the chief of geriatric and palliative medicine at North Shore-LIJ Health System, recently completed a case study and literature review that she will be presenting to The American Geriatrics Society's Annual Scientific Meeting this weekend.

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A special place for elderly with severe dementia

A special place for elderly with severe dementia is showcased here:


In a Dutch town about 20 kilometres outside of Amsterdam, a small community lives in what at first glance seems like a real-life version of The Truman Show.

Hogewey has a grocery store, a theatre and a barber shop. The only twist is that many of its 152 residents live unaware that their orderly community is actually a nursing home for people with severe dementia.

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