Guidebook to personal medical alert systems

There is a very helpful guidebook now available about home and personal medical alert systems for the elderly. It was proudced by the National Council for Aging Care.We think you will find it interesting and helpful. Find it here:


Falling is a danger for elderly

Falling is a danger for eldelry loved ones.

The Dutch, like people elsewhere, are living longer than in previous generations. Courses that teach fall prevention, and how to fallcorrectly, are gaining popularity. 

This link leads to a very interesting article from the New York TImes that explores and explains what the Dutch are doing:

Nursing home warning signs to watch for

There are some nursing home warning signs to watch for.

As those wanting to help and protect our aging parents and other loved ones, we need to be very careful in how we select nusring homes for them.

Here are the first two paragraphs for a Toronto Star article from a few months ago that underscore the reasons for flashing warning signs for us all:

Three troubled Ontario nursing homes — including a Mississauga home — have been ordered to stop accepting new residents due to substandard care.

The crackdown came this week after the Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care ordered each to “cease admissions,” meaning no new residents are allowed to move into the homes.

The message for us: 

Be very thorough and intense about examing any nursing home for your parents or other aging loved ones. Make sure you take the time to look carefully at the facility and what it offers. 

Take the sniff test: can you smell urine in the hallways, common rooms, shared bedrooms?

Talk to staff, residents, and family members of residents. Ask probing questions. 

In fact, if you want to be extra careful, come spot visit at various times of day and night a few times to get a sense of the care giving going on. 

There are lots of optons out there. Take your time, be patient, research. After all, you're making decisons that will impact the lives of your aging parents and perhaps other elderly loved ones.



Elderly financial abuse

ELderly financil abuse keeps getting a bigger issue.

As an elder, or more often as the child of an enderly parent or relative, please take a vary careful look at anything that's offered, foisted, pressed on you… 

We're seeing more and more scames being launched onto the elderly.

Please take a careful double look… examine, consider, and don't buy in right away!

See this site for more…

Keep elderly on the move

Japan automakers look to robots to keep elderly on the move

TOKYO (Reuters) – Japanese automakers are looking beyond the industry trend to develop self-driving cars and turning their attention to robots to help keep the country's rapidly graying society on the move.

Toyota Motor Corp said it saw the possibility of becoming a mass producer of robots to help the elderly in a country whose population is ageing faster than the rest of the world as the birthrate decreases.

The country's changing demographics place its automakers in a unique situation. Along with the issues usually associated with falling populations such as labor shortages and pension squeezes, Japan also faces dwindling domestic demand for cars.

Toyota, the world's second largest automaker, made its first foray into commercializing rehabilitation robots on Wednesday, launching a rental service for its walk assist system, which helps patients to learn how to walk again after suffering strokes and other conditions.

Toyota's system follows the release by Honda Motor Co of its own walking assist "robotic legs" in 2015, which was based on technology developed for its ASIMO dancing robot.

"If there's a way that we can enable more elderly people to stay mobile after they can no longer drive, we have to look beyond just cars and evolve into a maker of robots," Toshiyuki Isobe, chief officer of Toyota's Frontier Research Center, told Reuters in an interview on Wednesday.

Speaking to reporters, he added that mass producing robots would be a natural step for the company which evolved from a loom maker in 1905 into an automaker whose mission is to "make practical products which serve a purpose".

"Be it robots or cars, if there's a need for mass produced robots, we should do it with gusto," Isobe said.


Japan is graying faster than the rest of the world, with the number of people aged 65 or older accounting for 26.7 percent of the population in 2015, dwarfing the global average of about 8.5 percent. 

As a result, demand for care services for elderly people has boomed and a shrinking working population means that fewer able-bodied adults are available to look after them.

Globally, sales of robots for elderly and handicap assistance will total about 37,500 units in 2016-2019, and are expected to increase substantially within the next 20 years, according to the International Federation of Robotics. 

At the same time, car sales in Japan have fallen 8.5 percent between 2013-2016, as older drivers stop buying cars while car ownership becomes less of a priority among younger drivers.

Like most major automakers, Toyota is still competing fiercely to develop self-driving cars, committing $1 billion to a robotics and A.I. research center.

Isobe conceded that it took Toyota longer to develop robots than cars, as it stretched the company further beyond its comfort zone. As a result, Toyota's new walking assist system took more than 10 year to bring to market.

"The biggest challenges have been in determining the needs of the robot market, which is relatively new, and to ensure that our products are safe," Isobe said.

Still, industry experts said that automakers were well placed to compete with medical technology companies including Switzerland's Hocoma and robot manufacturers such as ReWalk Robotics of the United States, both of which have developed robotic walking assist systems.

"Cars operate using engines and other components which enable mobility and control," said Nagayoshi Nakano, research vice president at Gartner Research's IoT Center of Excellence.

"On top of that, many of them have been partnering with the likes of Google and other companies looking at applying artificial intelligence, which will put them in a strong position to compete in robot services for the elderly."


Looks like dementia, but it’s not!

There is a disorder that's been identified that looks like dementia, but it's not! Apparently, it presents a number of similar symtoms and so can be disdiagnosed as some variation of dementia. However, in this case, it can be treated if identified correctly

To read more about this form CTV, look here:

Don’t let spring cleaning become spring falling for the elderly

It just happened to my wife, an avid early morning walker. She does everything ‘right’ in terms of the ‘right’ shoes, coat, scarf, hat—you name it –she does it. The only thing she does not do is make sure the weather is perfect and receptive to activities of middle, later age, and elderly individuals. 

Continue reading “Don’t let spring cleaning become spring falling for the elderly”

Living close to high-traffic roads raises dementia risk: study

People who live in close proximity to high-traffic roadways appear to have a higher risk of dementia than those who live farther away, say researchers, suggesting that air pollution from vehicles may be a factor in the development of the neurological disease. Read more here:

Falling down: Accept your fate and roll with it

Falling down: Accept your fate and roll with it is a very timely and helpful piece that appeared in
The Globe and Mail Metro (Ontario Edition) on January 26, written by KATE MURPHY
KATHY OSBORN of the New York Times. It's a good 'heads up' for aging boomers and our elderly parents and other loved ones.

Rare is the individual who hasn’t tripped over a pet or uneven pavement, tumbled off a bike, slipped on ice or maybe wiped out skiing or skating.

Some get injured while others go unhurt – often claiming it’s because they knew how to fall.

Continue reading “Falling down: Accept your fate and roll with it”

We must protect the elderly and aging when crossing streets

The Mayor of the City of Toronto recently called to safety islands to be created for the elderly and aging to use when crossing busy and large intersections. This is has been an issue on my mind for a long time. The piece below I wrote last year precisely about this all too common threat. 

Bottom line: We must protect the elderly and aging when crossing streets.

Watching the ribbon of news on roll across the bottom of my television is often very disturbing. 

Continue reading “We must protect the elderly and aging when crossing streets”