‘Con­sci­en­tious daugh­ter’ is best long-term care plan

This was originally from the New York Times News Service  by Roni Caryn Rabin, and appeared in Canada on May 26th, 2017. I'd filed it, and forgot about it, but having just found it agian, feel it's important to share. So please take a look a this and reflect…

 

‘Con­sci­en­tious daugh­ter’ is best long-term care plan!


This week, the med­i­cal jour­nal JAMA Neu­rol­ogy high­lighted a loom­ing cri­sis for women and their em­ploy­ers: The grow­ing ranks of de­men­tia pa­tients who will end up re­ly­ing on fam­ily mem­bers, typ­i­cally daugh­ters, for their care.


“The best long-term care in­sur­ance in our coun­try is a con­sci­en­tious daugh­ter,” wrote the au­thors, all of whom are fel­lows at Stan­ford Univer­sity’s Clin­i­cal Ex­cel­lence Re­search Cen­ter, which stud­ies new meth­ods of health-care de­liv­ery.


The au­thors note that by 2030, one in five Amer­i­cans will be 65 or older, and the num­ber of older Amer­i­cans liv­ing with de­men­tia is ex­pected to in­crease to 8.5 mil­lion, up from 5.5 mil­lion now.


Most de­men­tia pa­tients even­tu­ally re­quire round-the-clock care, yet there is no clear na­tional road map or over­ar­ch­ing plan for pro­vid­ing it. Most of the care for older adults in the United States – from pay­ing bills to feed­ing, bathing and dress­ing – falls on un­paid care­givers and most of them are women.


Although men do pro­vide some care­giv­ing for older fam­ily mem­bers with de­men­tia, the bur­den is not shared equally, ex­perts say.


“Women are at the epi­cen­tre of care­giv­ing as a whole, and Alzheimer’s care­giv­ing in par­tic­u­lar,” said Ruth Drew, di­rec­tor of fam­ily and in­for­ma­tion ser­vices at the Alzheimer’s As­so­ci­a­tion. “Even though two-thirds of peo­ple with Alzheimer’s are women them­selves, two-thirds of the care­givers are also women. So there are more wives car­ing for their hus­bands than the re­verse, more daugh­ters car­ing for par­ents than sons.”


“We see a lot of daugh­ters car­ing not only for their par­ents, but their in-laws,” she added.
Most ex­perts don’t an­tic­i­pate that chang­ing sig­nif­i­cantly. That’s be­cause, de­spite progress, women con­tinue to do a dis­pro­por­tion­ate amount of child care.


Although men have be­come more in­volved and taken on more re­spon­si­bil­i­ties at home, “it hasn’t been a sig­nif­i­cant con­tri­bu­tion and cer­tainly hasn’t kept pace with women’s in­creased
par­tic­i­pa­tion in the work force,” said Dr. Clif­ford Sheck­ter, a fel­low at the Clin­i­cal Ex­cel­lence Re­search Cen­ter, surgery res­i­dent and a co-au­thor of the es­say.


When it comes to car­ing for peo­ple with de­men­tia, “the num­bers are skewed strongly to­ward women, and it’s hard to imag­ine that by 2030 the num­bers will even out to 50-50,” said Ni­cholas Bott, a neu­ropsy­chol­o­gist and an­other co-au­thor who is also a fel­low at the Clin­i­cal Ex­cel­lence Re­search Cen­ter. “It shouldn’t be an un­spo­ken rule that this falls on cer­tain mem­bers of the fam­ily, but as of now, it still is fall­ing pri­mar­ily on the daugh­ters and fe­male spouses more than on men.”